Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Information coming soon
Home > Tracks
Track 12: Research Methods and Philosophy

  • Track Chairs
    Ananth Srinivasan
    University of Auckland
    a.srinivasan@auckland.ac.nz
    Edgar Whitley
    London School of Economics and Political Science
    E.A.Whitley@lse.ac.uk
  • Track Description

    Although frequently explored as distinct topics, there is inevitably a close symbiotic relationship between philosophical perspectives on information systems and the research methods used to study information systems. This track welcomes submissions that focus on methodological issues pertaining to the discovery and creation of new knowledge to advance the IS discipline as well as philosophically inspired approaches to IS research. Particularly welcome are papers that seek to address methodological concerns (whether quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods) in a broader philosophical world view.

    Topics of interest for the track include, but are not limited to:

    • How can multiple methods be used more effectively and in varied combinations to shed light on continuing and vexing problems?
    • Do recent technological developments and data sets: social networking, cloud computing, green computing etc. indicate novel research directions and methodological challenges for the IS field?
    • How can problems that have traditionally been addressed through particular approaches such as experiments or surveys be re-envisioned using other techniques? What insights might philosophy provide to the address the concerns that such a strategy might uncover?
    • In what ways do the characteristics of many information systems phenomena offer the opportunity for IS research to influence research methods and philosophical perspectives in neighbouring disciplines?
    • How might the information systems field build on examples of innovative approaches to the use of semiotics, hermeneutics, narrative analysis, causal or concept mapping, content analysis, and other qualitative methods?
    • How might the information systems field build on means covariance structures (longitudinal or growth models), hierarchical/multilevel modeling, and nonlinear partial least squares or covariance structural equation modelling (SEM) analysis?
    • Given the ever expanding knowledge and range of quantitative techniques, are there emerging approaches to various statistical procedures and tests that can be emphasized for continual improvement of quantitative methods, for example, to address common method variance issues?
    • What are the methodological and ethical considerations for the creation of large datasets from data available in the public domain?
    • Although the IS field has adopted many philosophical approaches, are there novel philosophical perspectives that can usefully be incorporated into the study of information technology?
    • How effective is philosophy for providing a means of revealing and assessing key assumptions that shape and drive the research agenda of the field?
  • Associate Editors

    • Giri Tayi, University of Albany, New York, USA
    • Geoffrey Hubona, Virginia Commonwealth, USA
    • Arvind Tripathi, University of Auckland, New Zealand
    • Mani Subramani, University of Minnesota, USA
    • Wynne Chin, University of Houston, USA
    • Suzanne Rivard, HEC Montreal, Canada
    • Ulrike Schultz, Southern Methodist University, USA
    • Timothy Hill, San Jose State University, USA
    • Joerg Evermann, Memorial University, Canada
    • Dave Wastell, Nottingham University, UK
    • Nik R Hassan, University of Minnesota, USA
    • Bernd Carsten Stahl, De Montfort Univesity, UK
    • Jeremy Rose, Aalborg University, Denmark
    • Alan Litchfield, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand
    • Laurence Brooks, Brunel University, UK
    • Jan Kroeze, North-West University, South Africa
    • Nehemiah Mavetera, North-West University, South Africa
    • Andrew Basden, Salford University, UK
    • Eleanor Wynn, Intel, USA
    • Evgeny Kaganer, IESE, Spain

    Back to Information about Tracks

Copyright ICIS2011